History Alive 9 Victorian Curriculum 2E LearnON and Print Image

History Alive 9 Victorian Curriculum 2E LearnON and Print

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ISBN:9780730380511
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RRP:$59.95
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Jacaranda History Alive 9 Victorian Curriculum, 2nd Edition learnON & Print
This combined print and digital title provides 100% coverage of the Victorian Curriculum for History. The textbook comes with a complimentary activation code for learnON, the powerful digital learning platform making learning personalised and visible for both students and teachers.

The latest editions of Jacaranda History Alive Victorian Curriculum series include these key features:

  • teachON – video lessons by Victoria’s best teachers, teaching advice and lesson plans
  • learnON – our most powerful digital learning platform
    • An immersive digital platform in which students and teachers are connected
    • Rich media to engage and inspire
    • Immediate, corrective feedback for students and an in-built testmaker for teachers to create assignments from a large pool of questions for immediate, spaced and mixed practice.
    • Results reported against skills and content allow unmatched visibility of students’ progress.
  • Thinking Big research projects – creative, imaginative, collaborative activities
  • SkillBuilders – Tell me, Show me, Let me do it!

For teachers, learnON includes additional teacher resources such as quarantined questions and answers, curriculum grids and work programs.

To complement the History Alive series, Jacaranda World History Atlas and MyWorld History Atlas (digital) is available for Years 7–10.

How to use the Jacaranda History Alive resource suite vi

Acknowledgements ix

1 Historical skills and concepts 1

1.1 Overview 1

1.2 Why we study history 2

1.3 Historical skills 4

1.4 Perspectives and empathy 12

1.5 SkillBuilder: Sequencing events in chronological order

1.6 Review

2 The Industrial Revolution: Technology and progress 17

2.1 Overview 17

2.2 Examining the evidence 19

2.3 Causes of the Industrial Revolution 21

2.4 The agricultural revolution 24

2.5 The growth of empire 29

2.6 Entrepreneurs, banks and the middle class 33

2.7 The population explosion 36

2.8 Power: from horses, wind and water to steam 39

2.9 Making textiles: from home to factory 43

2.10 Coal and iron 47

2.11 Canals, roads, railways and shipping 49

2.12 Industrial innovation spreads to the world 55

2.13 SkillBuilder: Identifying continuity and change

2.14 Thinking Big research project: Promoting industrialisation

2.15 Review

3 The Industrial Revolution: The impact on people 60

3.1 Overview 60

3.2 Examining the evidence 62

3.3 The impact of enclosure 64

3.4 Conditions in factories and mines 69

3.5 Child labour 73

3.6 Urban conditions and people’s health 76

3.7 Poor laws and workhouses 79

3.8 Social unrest and trade unions 81

3.9 The growth in ideas 85

3.10 Reformers and progress 91

3.11 SkillBuilder: Analysing different perspectives

3.12 Thinking Big research project: City life visual diary

3.13 Review

4 Movement of peoples (1750–1914) 96

4.1 Overview 96

4.2 Examining the evidence 98

4.3 Overview of slavery 100

4.4 Slavery and the cotton trade 106

4.5 The end of slavery? 109

4.6 Crime and punishment 111

4.7 Transportation to Australia 114

4.8 Convict life 118

4.9 Emigration to Australia 122

4.10 Migration to the goldfields 126

4.11 SkillBuilder: Analysing cause and effect

4.12 Thinking Big research project: A migrant’s letter home

4.13 Review

5 Australia (1750–1918): Colonisation and conflict 133

5.1 Overview 133

5.2 Examining the evidence 135

5.3 Two civilisations meet 139

5.4 Resistance 146

5.5 Tragedy in Van Diemen’s Land 150

5.6 1835: Conquest — the great land rush to Port Phillip 153

5.7 Violence on the frontier 158

5.8 Reserves, missions and responses 163

5.9 A long, forgotten war 172

5.10 The Torres Strait Islanders 177

5.11 A celestial presence: the Chinese in Australia 179

5.12 SkillBuilder: Determining historical significance

5.13 The ideal of ‘White Australia’ 184

5.14 Thinking Big research project: Colonisation and conflict exhibition

5.15 Review

6 Australia (1750–1918): From colonies to nationhood 191

6.1 Overview 191

6.2 Examining the evidence 193

6.3 Towards democracy: Eureka and political rights 195

6.4 Whose Australia? Free selectors vs squatters 203

6.5 An Australian legend 205

6.6 Marvellous Melbourne: A city giant 209

6.7 Working in cities and towns 213

6.8 Trade unions and political parties 216

6.9 Nationalism and Australian identity 220

6.10 SkillBuilder: Analysing cartoons

6.11 Voting rights for women 224

6.12 Federation 229

6.13 The early Commonwealth 236

6.14 Thinking Big research project: The Federation Game

6.15 Review

7 China (1750–1918) 243

7.1 Overview 243

7.2 Examining the evidence 245

7.3 Qing China 247

7.4 Living under the emperor 250

7.5 Arrival of the foreigners 253

7.6 Expansion, trade, conflict 255

7.7 Economic and social effects 260

7.8 Resistance in China 266

7.9 Continuity and change 271

7.10 SkillBuilder: Analysing cause and effect

7.11 Thinking Big research project: Key events visual summary

7.12 Review

8 World War I (1914–1918) 276

8.1 Overview 276

8.2 Examining the evidence 278

8.3 What caused the Great War? 281

8.4 The world at war 287

8.5 Australians in the Great War 290

8.6 Gallipoli 293

8.7 Gallipoli: the historical debate 299

8.8 Trench warfare 301

8.9 The Western Front 303

8.10 The home front 306

8.11 The conscription issue 312

8.12 The Eastern Front: collapse and revolution 315

8.13 Peace and commemoration 319

8.14 The war’s impact on Australia’s international relations 324

8.15 SkillBuilder: Analysing photos

8.16 Thinking Big research project: Western Front battlefields guide

8.17 Review

Glossary 330

Index 335